MASSLIVE: Massachusetts Congressman Michael Capuano: ‘I didn’t ask to be a super delegate’
As originally appearing in MassLive

BY GINTAUTAS DUMCIUS

BOSTON – The topic of super delegates was once fairly esoteric.

But the closer-than-anticipated Democratic presidential primary between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders has brought it to the forefront, with some calling for the party to look at the process behind super delegates.

In the Democratic primary and national convention, super delegates are free to support whoever they want. But Sanders supporters have cried foul as many are supporting Clinton, who is also ahead in primary votes.

Over the weekend, at the annual Massachusetts Democratic Convention in Lowell, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass, said she was a super delegate and she believes super delegates shouldn’t “sway the election.”

Speaking to the New England Council on Monday morning, Congressman Michael Capuano, D-Mass., was also asked about super delegates.

“I didn’t ask to be a super delegate,” said Capuano, who holds the position because he, like Warren, is an elected official. Party leaders can also be super delegates.

Warren is publicly unaligned and has said there is no timeline for an endorsement in the primary. Capuano is backing Clinton.

“Some of it’s nonsense,” Capuano said of the super delegate process.

But Clinton is still winning, the super delegates aside, Capuano said.

“I have no beef with Bernie,” Capuano said. “And I’m glad he’s in.”

He added that he is “perfectly okay” with a review of the super delegate process.

“I’m not tied to super delegates, I didn’t ask for them, I didn’t know who most of them were until this whole brouhaha happened,” Capuano said. “I went to look to see who’s from Massachusetts, some of them I don’t know. Some of them I know, I know why they’re there, and I know why I’m there.”

If super delegates are done away with and he ends up having to run for a delegate slot, he would be put in the position of claiming it over a hard-working party activist, a prospect he doesn’t relish, Capuano added.

Capuano said he is supporting Clinton despite disagreeing with her on some issues, like the Iraq war. Clinton voted for the Iraq war while Capuano voted against it.

“It’s a multi-question issue when you decide who you’re going to support. One is philosophy, number two is winnability,” Capuano said. “What good is supporting somebody who is perfectly aligned with you on every issue if they can’t win?”

img_side
mask_sidebar
Recently from the Blog

Biogen Contributes $10 Million Toward Improving STEM Programs

01/17/2018 | Read Post

Framingham State University Receives $1.5 Million Grant for Training Teachers

01/17/2018 | Read Post

In the News

NEC to Honor New Englanders of the Year at 2017 Annual Dinner

10/25/2017 | Read Press Release

NEC Elects Six Respected Regional Business Leaders to Board of Directors

09/25/2017 | Read Press Release